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Attracting Top Talent: Using Your Design Skills

April 11 2018 - Every Human Resources manager knows the importance of attracting impressive and driven employees to their business. It includes advertising jobs in the right publications and having a keen recruitment process, which should ensure you get the right candidates through the door.

However, have you ever considered the importance of branding and design in attracting top talent to your business? Much as brand communication is crucial for engaging your target consumer, potential employees will also use logo, identity, website and company tone of voice to decipher whether your business is a good match for their personality and their ambitions.

Here are some of the ways you can use your brand design to improve your recruitment potential:

What Does Your Logo Say About You?

Semiotics and symbolism are visual shortcuts used by designers to communicate specific values and messages. How closely have you inspected your company logo to decode its meaning to possible partners? Circles convey integrity and completeness, squares shout stability and equality, while a triangle communicates progression and dynamism. Don't underestimate the influential power of your logo design. Instead, you should partner with an expert design and marketing agency who have a strong history of effective design work, such as the team at Eventige.

Revisit Your Website Design

How effectively does your website explain the work you do and what kind of business you are? Quite often, your website is one of the first places a prospective employee will visit to gain important information about your company, and as such, it should perform optimally.

You must think of the website in terms of more than written information and copy. The colors, imagery, and usability of the website will all also give visitors an opinion of the business you run. Research color theory to ensure the hues you're using give the right impression of who you are. Ensure, also, that your site navigation and user experience are smooth. If your website is difficult or confusing to use, it may suggest a lack of professionalism and subconsciously suggest you're a difficult company to work with.

Connect With Candidates Using Social Platforms

These days, the lines between professional and personal lives are increasingly blurred. As such, workers don't mind communicating with businesses via channels that were, traditionally, saved for personal interactions. Social media channels, such as Facebook and Instagram, can, therefore, be a good place to attract talent to your company.

This being said, you should come to an agreement on the appropriate tone of voice for your business on these platforms. While it's potentially beneficial to be informal and friendly, you still want to portray confidence and imbue professionalism. Companies such as Intel and Adidas manage to convey a chatty tone of voice while staying true to their brand values of inspirational and educational.

The Power Of Brand Design

You may not have fully acknowledged the influential nature of brand design, especially when it comes to communicating on a business-to-business level with prospective future employees. It's possible that following some minor tweaks and assessment of your current brand design, you find an increase in quantity (and quality!) of applicants.




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